In the News

September 11, 2017

The final week for the state legislative year opens Monday morning and it’s the last chance this year for California legislators to pass new laws.

September 7, 2017

Californians now pay more for their prescription drugs than they do for their doctors. The state spent a whopping $4 billion on drugs in 2015, and pharmaceutical companies are pushing another 12 percent increase in 2017.

September 4, 2017

Assemblyman Chad Mayes, Assemblyman Eduardo Garcia and Sen. Jeff Stone – who all represent parts of the Coachella Valley in the Legislature – play a crucial role in the fight against cancer by passing laws that help reduce the toll of cancer, which will claim nearly 60,000 lives in California this year alone.

August 29, 2017

In response to some health insurers leaving the individual market, state lawmakers are considering a bill that would ensure continuity of care for people with complex health conditions. The measure would require a new insurance firm to cover the providers of qualifying patients, even if the provider isn't in the insurer's network.

July 24, 2017

Led by their trade group, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, drugmakers insist that they have consumers’ best interests at heart and warn that over-regulation would hamper their ability to deliver life-saving drugs.

July 24, 2017

After years of failed efforts, the California Legislature may finally pass a bill that responds to the problem of rising prescription drug costs. But temper your enthusiasm: Though this measure (SB 17) has been fiercely resisted by the pharmaceutical industry, it wouldn’t actually stop manufacturers from raising their prices as high as they think the market will bear.

June 27, 2017

Local and state politicians welcomed Tuesday's news that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has delayed the vote on the GOP health bill. But they, along with a number of health industry leaders,  said it won't affect their resolve to fight for the legislation's ultimate defeat.

June 26, 2017

Senate Republicans’ legislation to overhaul the Affordable Care Act would leave an additional 22 million people without health care coverage over the next decade and cut the federal deficit by $321 billion, according to a Congressional Budget Office analysis released late Monday.